Levee Town – Trying to Keep My Head Above Water | Album Review

Levee Town – Trying to Keep My Head Above Water

Hudtone Records

www.leveetown.com

9 tracks

Brandon Hudspeth is originally from Oklahoma and now lives in Kansas City. He formed Leevee Town in Kansas City from members of he band Cobalt Project. He is a skilled vocalist and guitar player; others in the band are Jacque Garoutte on bass and vocals and on drums it is Adam Hagerman. Tilney Ehrhardt adds keys. This CD was recently nominated for Best Rock Blues Album in the Blues Blast Music Awards.

“Music Martyr” opens the album. It’s a rocking and great sounding song with some killer guitar licks and tells us how they are trying to do what the album title says, “Trying to head my head above water.” The vocals have a country tinge to them, but it’s a nice rocker for sure! “Locked Up For Days” follows, a slower cut with some visceral guitar and a deep rock groove. Powerful licks on the solo are offered up; tastefully done! Next is Little Milton’s  “Looking For My Baby” featuring some nice added keyboard work. Powerful guitar work makes this just a nice blues tune to enjoy. “Gala” follows in a fun, driving, Chuck Berry sort of style. Guitar and piano frolic as the boys deliver another nice cut. “Outside Child” is a bouncing piece with a little rockabilly sound going for it. They’ll be dancing to this one; it really moves and grooves well.

“Tarantino” is a great instrumental that offers another driving beat and a sound that could be featured in any Quentin Tarantino film. The inspiration is easy to pick up on; one could see this as part of the soundtrack for Pulp Fiction or any of his films. The guitar stings like a bee as it drives the song along. “She Might Kill You” follows, another cool blues rock cut with heavy guitar again along with some slick organ. A mid tempo cut, it offers a warning to a friend about a woman. Things slow way down for “Weight of the World” where acoustic guitar is featured. It’s definitely a change of pace and offers us a different side of Levee Town, perhaps even Beatle-esque in nature. The Freddy King shuffle “The Stumble” concludes the set, offering the listener another cool instrumental piece to savor. It’s a sweetly done song that gets a nice boogie going that you will love.

There is nothing to dislike here; nine songs (seven brand new ones penned by Hudspeth) with some great musicians doing what they do best – playing some kick ass, rocking blues! I really enjoyed this album and I think all blues rock lovers will, too. It deserves notice!